Sunday, 10 March 2013

PHOTIES ON THE SABBATH








Thanks to the Facebook page Scots language for Scottish Independence. As ever click on imagines for larger size that you can actually read.  There is also a Facebook page Liberal Democrat voters for Independence.

27 comments:

  1. Gaelic is a lovely language. My wee grannie speaks it as her first language.

    As does my mother, but not me. It seems to be a dying language, which is a shame.

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  2. Great shame, Dean.

    I know that it is costly, but I believe in trying to keep small languages going.

    It would make economic sense that everyone speak English, across the world (although I'm pretty sure that Mandarin will replace that pretty soon) but think of the culture we would lose.

    I believe that it is worth the money spent to try to maintain minority languages, and the BBC Alba project is a good one.

    I feel similarly about Scots.

    I wish I spoke Gaelic, but it's incredibly hard to learn as a adult.

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  3. It is a tragedy. And the question we need to ask is just how aggressive has our Holyrood politicians been in trying to make it easier to learn.

    Access to gaelic lessons in mainstream schooling is something that ought to happen, alongside French and German. Why are we learning foreign languages while ignoring our own? English isn't my natural language - and it does perturb me that I'm a language exile ... in my own bloody country.

    The worst thing is, I can see the language actually dying off - within my own family. Gran goes, then its only mum (and she by now hasn't spoken it in so long her skills are reduced).

    Its worrying. And forcing local councils to stick up sign posts in Gaelic as well as English simply isn't good enough.

    This area is one of Holyroods biggest dropped balls. And all parties are to blame on this. They are all of them too central belt gravitated. That goes for the SNP too. I have big problems with their attitudes to highlands and islands issues. Their crofting reforms are as messy as the Labour ones which went before.

    Fingers out!

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  4. Gaelic is a lovely language. My wee grannie speaks it as her first language.

    As does my mother, but not me. It seems to be a dying language, which is a shame.


    Do you not speak to your mother?

    And then this.

    This area is one of Holyroods biggest dropped balls. And all parties are to blame on this.

    Fingers out!


    Blaming others for your own obvious laziness sums you up to a a tee.

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    1. Yeah, I only speak two languages at the moment. 'Lazy' really sums me up. That from a silly cybernat extremist (a grown man with little better to do than try and pick online fights. Probably an alcoholic).

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    2. I think you'll find that Cynical speaks two or more languages too, Dean.

      What other language do you speak, by the way?

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  5. A word that I am looking how to spell is 'whamels' if you ken fit that is.

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  6. The Bunny one made me laugh.

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  7. Well, I suppose that it is not a priority for any government in the current climate. But the current government got the tv station and the grant for language learning has increased.

    The trouble with offering courses is that there are not enough teachers competent to teach. I imagine that to do that anywhere other than the islands, and perhaps Glasgow (maybe even Edinburgh) every single Gaelic speaker would ahve to be employed as a teacher!

    Not everyone wants to do it, and some Gaelic speakers, like those of other languages, speak the language badly, ungrammatically... and wouldn't want to face kids every day.

    You should encourage your mother to speak the language to you, and profit from her knowledge.

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  8. The United Kingdom is Over: Scotland Will be Independent

    It's not breaking up, it's broken. The UK is no more. It has ceased to be. It's expired. It's a memory, bereft of relevance. It rests in peace. If it wasn't being propped up by circumstance it would be filling history books. It's governmental processes have ceased. The UK is an ex-country.

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  9. No idea... what does it mean CH...

    There are online dictionaries...

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  10. CH: There is a discrepancy with the figures tehy quote.

    As far as I can see they don't take into consideration the money that is spend by London on Scotland (ie defence; foreign affairs etc). That's why they come up with the subsidy of England at £3,500, and other figures show a subsidy of £850 ...

    That apart, the way these people talk about us like we were lucky to be subsidised by them!!!!! makes my blood boil.

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    Replies
    1. GERS is a gerrymandered system dreamt up by Ian Lang to keep Scotland in its place. The subsidy nonsense is because they compare a single entity to the average sum of all others not that our 'honest' media are able to evaluate that.

      Consultant says claims over cross-border patient care after independence are scaremongering

      Dr Khan spoke out after Jackie Baillie, Labour’s shadow health spokeswoman and a director of the Better Together campaign, claimed that a Yes vote in next year’s referendum would lead to reciprocal patient treatment becoming mired in red tape and complex regulation.

      No doubt our state broadcaster will be highlighting this on the hour for three or four days on the trot!

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  11. The wee bunny is fantastic, Marcia.

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  12. C.H
    Re whammel When you asked what was for dinner you were told whammel Now whammel could have been anything either because your mammy didn't know what you were going to get or you had not to be told in case you didn't want it Not that there was any choice It was eat or go hungry so you ate regardless

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    1. Cheers as I understood it as 'nothing or unknown' it was the spelling as I can find no reference online in either Doric or Scots which seems strange unless it was site specific in its origin.

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  13. Another saying along the same line which I remember but have no idea what it might have been was being told we were having Carluke steak

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  14. Did anyone else's parents/grandparents reply :
    "Stoor in a poke for nosey folk", when you, as a kid asked, "What have you got there?" ?

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  15. Spoke to a relative who has told me Carluke steak was jam Apparently miners when asked what they had on their piece would say Carluke steak when they had jam. Jam was made in Carluke by Scotts I am told You learn something every day

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  16. Good one Fairfor... There was a lot of that kind of thing. Gran calls water "Adam's wine"

    No CH... I don't mind. I might even get me one!!! :)

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  17. Tris/Dean

    The problem with Gaelic classes is that most people wish to learn conversational Gaelic whereas the classes seem to concentrate on reading and writing Gaelic which even for a native Gaelic speaker can be quite difficult. Having said that I learnt it when I was about two but then again I'm a smarty-pants!

    Moran gaol agus pogan to your Mum,. Tris!

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  18. Incidentally, Tris, you should not be posting photograph on the Sabbath. Satan will be heating up his red-hot poker for your bottom! Should have gone to Spec-savers, it is not his red-hot poker!!

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  19. A couple of my friends gave it a go at night classes at the university, John. Both are quite clever people, one of whom had done Latin and French at school, and they were completely lost.

    Yes, it was the spelling and trying to tie up the pronunciation with the spelling that was their problem.

    Fancy learning when you were two. Very clever. It's like when you go to France and all these clever little kids of 3 or 4 are fluent... makes me sick!

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  20. Satan you say? No chocolates, flowers or dinner first?

    Jeez. No wonder he's in hell. No manners at all.

    I'm gonna give him Niko's address!

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