Friday, January 18, 2013

HOW WAS IT FOR YOU SLOVAKIA?


Twenty years ago, on 1 January, 1993, Slovakia became an independent country. Slovakia’s Deputy Prime Minister, Miroslav Lajcak, has spoken to BBC Scotland about the journey Slovakia has taken since that momentous day.
Asked if Slovaks had any regrets given the specific challenges they faced in the early days as a post-Eastern bloc State and newly independent country, Mr Lajcak said: "Sure. It wasn't easy and that was one of the reasons why Czechoslovakia split, because of the structure of the economy in the Czech Republic and Slovakia was different." But he added: "Right now, Slovakia is doing really well."
YES SCOTLAND

14 comments:

  1. The Czech president was on Reporting Scotland, telling the Scots that they'd be forced to apply to the EU from outside as a new member. Oh, and they'd get a worse settlement than the current UK one, with very little influence. Gavin Esler was gleefully egging him on, milking it for all it was worth.

    A Czech puppet-maker interviewed last night said he thought independence had been a good deal for the Czech Republic, because they didn't have to subsidise Slovakia any more.

    Much was made of the original shared currency having failed, and how hard it was in the first few years. Obviously, we should all just give up and vote no.

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  2. Ahhh bless him, the Czech president. He hates the EU more than most Tory MPs. I'd not look to him for an unbiased view on the subject.

    Gavin Estler should stick to introducing the film section. He's not really very good at that but I guess not many people watch it.

    I'm happy for the Czech republic that they don't have to subsidise Slovakia. Slovakia seems to be doing quite nicely on its own.

    A shared currency won't last for long, I think. Because, like in Czech and Slovakia, the economies are moving in different directions, but it is important at the beginning not to damage the English pound by pulling a strong part of the economy away from it.

    I'd like to see a separate Scottish currency. A Crown or Pund or whatever, it doesn't matter, but I'd not like the English currency ruined in the process.

    Yeah, Rolfe... I think they'd like it if we gave up and voted NO.... but who wants to please Cameron and crew?

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  3. Maybe we should return to the wee bawbee tris ? A silver based coinage that was valuable and used in Scotland for centuries. Yes Reporting Scotland was dire tonight Rolfe. I did a 'Review' ;)

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  4. Rolfe


    Obviously, we should all just give up and vote no.


    Never was a truer word said or even a sentence
    life would be so much more pleasant if you
    unrepresentative malcontents
    and ner do wells would.

    SHUT THE FECK UP WITH YER NEGATIVITY


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  5. Dear me, Niko, you sound dreadfully angry about something. Somebody stole your scone?

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  6. By the way, I realise it was Glen Campbell, not Gavin Esler. I always get these two mixed up for some unfathomable reason.

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  7. Happy New Year, friends and Niko,

    It appears that the Czech Republic and Slovakia can live together in harmony and mutual benefit which is far removed from the NO campaign's version of an independent Scotland's relationship with the Former United Kingdom with the appropriate acronym.

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  8. Why not Monty? The Bawbee would do fine. How about, in honour of Niko, and his valiant attempts to retain the Tories as our government, we call the lesser currency after him. Thus "That will be ten bawbees and 4 nikos, please (B10:4n)?

    And because he's 2p short of a bob, we could maybe only have 99n in a bawbee?

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  9. Morning Niko. I see you're in a good mood again. Have a nice Saturday :)

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  10. Hmm, Rolfe... I rate Glen Campbell above Estler... not much, but a bit.

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  11. Hey, Happy New Year, John. Hope you're well.

    We missed you.

    I have a mate from the Czech Republic. The country is doing well. His dad is a factory worker and his mum a nurse, he is at university and they, as well as their apartment in town, have a second home in the countryside. The worst of the daft recession seems to have passed them by.

    I see no bitterness in him at all about the relationship with Slovakia. But if you want a negative spin put on anything, their president is just the one to do it, and clearly the BBC wanted a negative spin.

    What else would you expect?

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  12. tris


    yeah well the Slovaks I work with tell a different story but then so do the Latvians and the Polish.
    They say they will never ever go home so there you go
    perhaps the grass aint so green on the other Independent side.

    And of course now Fat boy Salmond has promised every
    person in Scotland a house we can look forward to
    10 million Bulgarians and Romanians swamping us.
    And there is nothing Fat boy can do as they are Scottish citizens courtesy of the EU.

    I heard they have erected signs in Romanian etc saying this way to snpland with a arrow pointing to Banff and buchan and all the freebies.


    Brownlie hows the diet not very well by the look of ya
    heard you had a fit when some one gave you shoes with laces
    for xmas.

    That true the last time you saw your toes Jock McConnell
    was king of Scotland.

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  13. Everyone tell you different stories Niko on different days of the week just to wind you up as yours are all made up.

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  14. ch

    But not about the east Europeans not at all

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